Training

Our Training Background

We feel that the key to training is teaching the owner/handler to think like a wolf and teach them to be good pack leaders. A dog's closest relative in the natural state is a wolf or wild dog. You have to consider how a dog relates to other dogs in that kind of natural social structure -- they live in packs and what they understand is ranking: 1, 2, 3, and so on.                       
 

To train a dog, you must communicate that you are Number 1 -- like an alpha wolf.  People begin to have problems when they don't teach their dog a ranking; their dog jumps up on them any time, won't come when it's called, and does what it wants to because he thinks he's equal in power with his owner.  Dogs are sensitive to stress.  A dog's confusion about how it fits into the family can create stress that leds to behavioral problems.  The confusion and stress are the result of miscommunication. The first thing you must learn is communication with your dog.  You can't expect the dog to understand what you say but he does understand your tone of voice and your behavior.
 

There can be but one Alpha.  You and your dog can't both be Alpha at the same time.  If there's a spouse in your family - the dog has to understand that he becomes #3 and is subordinate to you and your spouse.  If there's a child, your dog must know that he's #4.  When the Alpha isn't around, everyone moves up a notch and the dog respects that.
 

We teach owners how to understand "dog talk", the gestures and mannerisms dogs use to communicate.  We show people how to give "Alpha statements", the type of non-verbal behavior that wolves use to control the entire pack.  The Alpha wolf exhibits certain characteristics.  He constantly reminds his pack in a firm, yet caring way that he and ONLY he is charge.  He always eats first before allowing lower ranking pack members to eat their fill.  He can approach them but subordinates can't approach him.  He needs the authority when he goes hunting because he is not strong enough by himself to pull down large prey.  He must be assured that the others respect his authority. While this behavior might seem harsh at first, further observation will reveal that the Alpha does this out of care. Just as human parents discipline their children in an effort to shield them from harm, a pack leader must be devout and just to his subordinates to keep them out of harms way and the keep the pack happy and healthy.
 

 

Training

Board Training

Don't have time to attend classes?

We offer board training where we will train your dog for you! Contact us for more info.


** We are currently not accepting any new boarders at this time.**

6 Week Training Programs

We offer 3 six week training programs, which consists of one personal training session during the week, and one group session on Saturdays, for a total of 12 classes. 


Prices:

$350 for each 6 week session (12 classes)


Evaluations

 Not sure where to start? Bethel Kennels offers an evaluation appointment to help guide you to a starting point for our training courses that would best fit the need for both your family and pet.  

Call today to set up your appointment!